Deebo Samuel: Fantasy Football Sleeper

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

Deebo Samuel (6’0”, 214), Wide Receiver, South Carolina

15.3 Aggregate Score (3 Star Prospect)

Deebo Samuel is another prospect that has been gaining quite a bit of hype during the pre-draft process.  Samuel was one of the notable standouts all week at this years Reese’s Senior Bowl and followed that up with a good combine performance. Based on his combine, Samuel earned a SPARQ score of 118.5, which puts him in the 85th percentile.   Due to all of these different factors, Samuel has become a consensus top 10 wide receiver in this class.

Samuel was a 3-star recruit out of Inman, South Carolina.  While at Chapman High School, Samuel logged 166 catches for 2,751 yards and 36 touchdowns.  Samuel also add 133 rush attempts for 898 yards and 13 touchdowns on the ground.  After receiving offers from Appalachian State, East Carolina and Maryland, Samuel decided to attend South Carolina.

College Production

Samuel’s college production is not ideal.  Mainly due to injuries, Samuel failed to put up 1,000 receiving yards in a single season.  In his freshman, sophomore and junior season, Samuel had a combined 86 receptions for 1,280 yards and 5 touchdowns.  Then in his senior season, Samuel played in 12 games and totaled 62 receptions for 882 yards and 11 touchdowns.  Samuel was a Second Team All-SEC selection as a wide receiver.  Samuel also added 7 rushing touchdowns and 4 kick return touchdowns in his career at South Carolina.

The injuries are definitely concerning.  In his freshman and sophomore year, Samuel was constantly battling hamstring injuries.  His junior year, he broke his leg in a game against Kentucky.  I really liked watching Samuel’s film, but the hamstring issues leave me hesitant to buy all the way in on Samuel.

Speed/Acceleration: Aggregate Score: 5 (Personal Score: 5)

Samuel is extremely fast!  His upside is huge mainly because he has the speed to turn any play into a huge one.  He releases well off the line of scrimmage, which allows him to create a lot of space in his routes.  He accelerates extremely quickly after the catch.  He is a YAC monster that will really hurt a defense if given any space.

Route Running: Aggregate Score: 2.3 (Personal Score: 3)

From what I saw, Samuel is a decent route runner.  Samuel does a good job off creating separation and finding space.  The major concerns for our staff are that he ran a limited route tree and he seemed to rely on speed to create separation.  The majority of his routes run were screens, slants and outs.  This may very well be because that was part of the South Carolina scheme, but it would have been nice to see a bit more of a variety in his routes.

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 2 (Personal Score: 2)

The best way to describe Samuel’s blocking is inconsistent.  He shows a few instances of being able to engage with defenders, but for the most part, Samuel seems disinterested in blocking.  There are many instances of not giving effort and him attaching to a defender who already has someone blocking them when there are other defenders in the area.  Samuel really needs to buy into blocking if he wants to be on the field consistently early on in his career.

Handwork/Positioning: Aggregate Score: 2 (Personal Score: 2)

As I mentioned in his route running, Samuel relies on his speed to get open.  Samuel rarely went against press coverage, but when he did, he showed no handwork and relied on his ability to just run past defensive backs.  This is a major hole in his game.  In the NFL, defensive backs are going to be able to be physical with him at the line of scrimmage and be able to keep up with him.  If he stays primarily in the slot, this issue may be minimized or completely covered up.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score: 4 (Personal Score: 4)

Samuel’s athletic test scores definitely translate to his tape.  Samuel displays good elusiveness and contact balance after the catch.  He’s by no means a jump ball specialist, but he displayed pretty good hops on the film.  His athleticism really shows up when he is returning kicks.  Samuel displays a combination of great speed and athleticism which make him a game-changer when returning kicks.

Conclusion: Early 2nd round Target

Currently, I’m not at the point where I’d be willing to spend a 1st round rookie pick on Samuel.  I have concerns with his injury history, limited route tree and lack of handwork/footwork to help create separation.  Now, I do think there is promise for Samuel.  With his speed and athleticism, a team may fall in love with him and spend an early Day 2 pick on him.  If this happens and he goes to a team that has a need for a slot receiver, I could see spending a late 1st rounder on him.  Samuel has a ton of upside, but landing spot is going to be a huge factor in determining how much I will be willing to pay for him.

N’Keal Harry: Possible WR1 of the NFL Draft?

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

N’Keal Harry (6’2”, 228lbs) Wide Receiver, Arizona State

18 Aggregate Score (4-Star Prospect)

We have been pumping out article after article about the wide receivers in this draft class. It is a deep class that has a lot of people divided on who the best of the bunch is. N’Keal Harry is absolutely under consideration. A 4-star recruit out of Chandler High School in Arizona, Harry chose to remain home despite recruiting efforts from numerous big name schools. He committed to Arizona State in November of 2015.

In 3 years at Arizona State, Harry accumulated 2,889 yards on 213 catches. He scored 22 touchdowns and had an average YPC of 13.6. Along with the production, Harry made numerous highlight reel catches that put him on the radar of many NFL scouts. It’s not hard to see why the NFL is enamored with the Sun Devil WR.

Speed/Acceleration: Aggregate Score: 3.3 (Personal Score: 3)

Before I begin to break down my thoughts on Harry, I feel the need to explain my scores. This is the first year of The 48 Report and since it’s in its infancy, the scoring isn’t necessarily refined just yet. While it is a great system for starters, I felt as if my scores may have not reflected how I truly feel about Harry because I LOVE N’Keal Harry’s game. I’ll say that Harry isn’t a burner but has solid speed. A 4.57 40 yard dash at the combine proves as much. His game speed is good and he will not be docked for this at all.

Route Running: Aggregate Score: 3.3 (Personal Score: 3)

Harry is a precise route runner. He sets up defenders to make them look foolish. He also ran quite a few screens at Arizona State, which showed their propensity to get the ball into his hands. While he could always use some polish coming out of college, Harry seems to be pretty refined in this area of his game.

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 3 (Personal Score: 1)

I understand that I am a bit tougher in terms of scoring when it comes to blocking but Harry disappointed in this area. For a bigger guy who has a lot of strength (27 reps on the bench press at the combine), he isn’t as physical/aggressive as I would like him to be. He also was late at times getting to his blocks. He just did not impress me when it came to blocking for his teammates.

Handwork/Positioning: Aggregate Score: 3 (Personal Score: 3)

Harry has very solid hands and can swat defenders away with ease. He should have no problem beating press coverage in the NFL. The only thing I wish Arizona State did more of was throwing some jump balls his way. He is incredible when making contested catches and if he lands with a QB who trusts his receivers with 50/50 balls then Harry will be a problem in the NFL.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score: 4.3 (Personal Score: 4)

Harry is an athletic freak and his combine/pro day proved that. Hell his career at Arizona State proved as much. His vertical is impressive, his hands are top notch and he can get up to speed pretty well for his size. He is a physical specimen who deserves all the love he is getting heading into the draft.

Conclusion: Top 5 Fantasy Football pick

If you have the 1.01, you’re going to be considering N’Keal Harry. There is a lot of buzz around him right now and if I had to guess, he’s likely to go somewhere in the late first round. Our guys have been projecting him to the Colts with the 26th overall pick. If he lands in an ideal spot then Harry will be under serious consideration for the 1.01 in rookie drafts.

Post-NFL Combine Fantasy Football Ranking for the 2019 Wide Receiver Class

This article is an update to my original 2019 NFL Draft wide receiver rankings. My rankings specifically focus on the prospect’s ability to contribute to fantasy football rosters.

If you have not already, I encourage you to read my first article-I will reference it multiple times throughout this article. For more on the fantasy football values of the 2019 Draft Class, check out the 48 Report: our 2019 Rookie Database


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For more on the fantasy football values of the 2019 Draft Class, check out the 48 Report: our 2019 Rookie Database

Tier 1

RankChangeWide Receiver CollegeHeightWeight
1+1N’Keal HarryArizona State6’4″213
2+2DK MetcalfOle Miss6’4″228
3-2Kelvin HarmonNC State6’2″221
4-1Hakeem ButlerIowa State6’6″225
5AJ BrownOle Miss6’1″225

These 5 wide receivers continue to separate themselves from the rest of the 2019 NFL Draft class. What is not the same, however, is how they compare to each other.

Kelvin Harmon, who was my WR1 pre-combine, takes a big slide to WR3 post-combine. Harmon’s size was impressive: he weighed into the 89th percentile and his height puts him in the 76th percentile. Everything else, though, was far from impressive. He failed to score above the 28th percentile in the 40 yard dash, vertical jump, broad jump, 3-cone drill, and 20 yard shuttle. The combine does not highlight the things that I love about Harmon’s tape, so I’m not willing to let him slide too far in my rankings-but I can’t ignore this poor performance.

DK Metcalf had a freakish combine performance. He placed in the 95th percentile in 40 yard dash (at 6’4″ 228), the 93rd percentile in the vertical jump, and 97th percentile in the broad jump, and 99th percentile in bench press. Metcalf is getting knocked, however, for poor 3-cone drill and 20 yard shuttle scores; both of which were in the 3rd percentile or lower. Metcalf continues to suggest he will be boom/bust, but in fantasy football he is a risk worth investing in right now.

N’Keal Harry had a solid combine performance, and rose as a result of Harmon’s poor combine. Harry continues to be the most well rounded prospect in this draft class, giving him a very attractive ceiling for fantasy football players. Hakeem Butler had a solid combine, but slid because it was not to the level of Metcalf’s.

AJ Brown remains a safe option with your 1.05 overall pick-he is flying under the radar and has the tape to suggest he could be one of the best values of this draft class.

Tier 2

RankChangeWide RecieverCollegeHeightWeight
6+2Parris CampbellOhio State6’1″208
7+2Deebo SamuelSouth Carolina6’0″210
8+3Emanuel HallMissouri6’3″195

This tier is small, but mighty. These 3 wide receivers have separated themselves and have built momentum over the course of the last month.

Campbell jumped up from 8 to 6 in my rankings post-combine because it became much clearer to me how fast he is. Campbell comes off athletic and quick on tape, but his 4.31 40-yard dash proves to me he a whole new level of fast. He also proved his agility-placing in the 90th percentile in the 20-yard shuttle. Campbell also placed in the 92nd percentile in the vertical jump and 98th percentile in the broad jump.

I’m kicking myself for ranking Hall 11th overall pre-combine. I loved his tape and felt he could be a great “Y” receiver, but I let his limited route tree and injury history hold me back. His combine, though, proves his speed and athleticism cannot be denied. Hall ran a 4.39 40 yard dash; placing in the 87th percentile. He also jumped in the 98th percentile in the vertical jump and the 99th percentile in the broad jump.


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Tier 3

RankChangeWide RecieverCollegeHeightWeight
9NR*Stanley MorganNebraska6’1″200
10-3Jalen HurdBaylor6’4″217
11NR*Dillon MitchellOregon6’2″189
12NR*Terry McLaurinOhio State6’1″205
13NR*Miles BoykinNotre Dame6’4″228
14+1JJ Arcega-WhitesideStanford6’3225

*NR=Not Ranked. These are players who did not have film reviews at the time of my pre-combine article.

This tier is primarily players who I had not done film reviews of pre-combine. Hurd slid as a result of their additions, and because he missed the combine with a minor injury. Arcega-Whiteside also did not test at the combine but gets a slight bump from additional film review on him.

Stanley Morgan is an exciting gadget player. He gets off the line of scrimmage with aggressive hands and accelerates downfield very quickly. He catches almost every ball thrown his way and wins positioning consistently over bigger defenders. He is elusive, shifty, and has great vision with the ball in his hand-he has big YAC upside and could make a dangerous “Y” or slot receiver for an NFL squad.

It is fitting that Dillon Mitchell is ranked next to Hurd, because he is my next draft crush. He is seriously fast downfield and gets off the line of scrimmage very quickly. He has a diverse route tree and makes defenders look silly when he dekes them with his hip and shoulder movements. He is very athletic and Oregon lined him up outside, as a big slot, and often utilized him on jet sweeps. He has inconsistent hands, specifically when it comes to contested pass situations, but is upside is very appealing.

McLaurin’s 4.35 40 yard dash (91st percentile) got him on the radar of a lot of fantasy football players. His tape does show that burning defenders on go-routes is routine for this buckeye. He has great footwork and makes Big 10 defenders regret playing press coverage on him. He’s a scrappy player but he looks and plays very small on tape-often getting lit up by defenders. His speed makes him appealing, but his role in the NFL may be limited to the slot.

Miles Boykin went from unmentioned to unforgettable in Indianapolis. Boykin measured into at least the 80th percentile in: height, weight, wingspan, arm length, and hand size. He ran a 4.42 40 yard dash (83rd percentile)-which is very impressive for his size. He also placed in the 98th percentile in vertical jump and 99th percentile in broad jump. He placed in the 86th percentile in the 20 yard shuttle. His tape shows an athletic player who consistently beats defensive backs off the line of scrimmage. He lines up all over the field and is lethal at both the 2nd and 3rd levels of the field. His versatility is sure to be appealing to NFL teams, and in the right landing spot Boykin may sky rocket up my rankings.

Tier 4

RankChangeWide RecieverCollegeHeightWeight
15-5Marquise BrownOklahoma5’10”168
16-4Riley RidleyGeorgia6’2200
17-3Andy IsabellaU Mass5’10”190
18-5Anthony JohnsonBuffalo6’2207
19-13Lil’ Jordan HumphreyTexas6’4″225

Tier 4 is a group of receivers that have all slid a decent amount since my first rankings.

Marquise “Hollywood” Brown’s tape didn’t impress me, and he has missed the majority of the NFL Draft process due to a lisfranc injury. I have concerns as to whether he can get on the field quickly in the NFL and how far his draft capital will plummet.

Riley Ridley is another big name who did not impress me under original film review. He continues to slide as a result of a mediocre combine and the addition of new players into my rankings.

Isabella and Anthony Johnson’s slides are also primarily because of low film reviews and the addition of new players.

Lil’ Jordan Humphrey had an atrocious pro day that forced me to reconsider the athleticism I saw on tape. There is still a lot to like about his tape but it appears NFL teams have largely dropped him from day 2 or earlier consideration. His unique skillset and teams turning cold on him leave too many red flags to justify what was originally a bullish stance on him.

Tier 5

RankChangeWide Receiver CollegeHeightWeight
20NR*Hunter RenfrowClemson5’10”180
21-5Greg DortchWake Forest5’9″170
22NR*KeeSean JohnsonFresno State6’2″199
23-6DeMarkus LodgeOle Miss6’2″200
24NR*David SillsWest Viginia6’4″210

*NR=Not Ranked. These are players who did not have film reviews at the time of my pre-combine article.

Tier 5 is filled with dart-throw players; they are likely to go in the late rounds of your fantasy football rookie drafts and have low potential of turning into roster-changing caliber players.

Hunter Renfrow can be a good player in the NFL, but I don’t see, from his tape, a player who is likely to have a high impact in terms of fantasy football. He has good footwork that helps him get off the line of scrimmage quickly and be effective on comeback routes. He is elusive with the ball in his hand and has upside as a YAC player. His routes, however, are limited to the first third of the field; he rarely sees targets past 5-8 yards off the line of scrimmage. That, combined with his size make me question if he can emerge from a pigeon-holed slot role in the NFL.

KeeSean Johnson flashes some nice highlight reel plays. He moves quickly over the middle of the field, burns up the sideline, and extends his large frame to make himself a big target. He has great footwork and works a fairly built-out route tree. Johnson, though, has inconsistent hands and struggles to consistently perform on tape. That, in addition to the low level of competition he had to perform against at Fresno State leave him in dart-throw territory.

David Sills had good production in Will Grier’s West Virginia offense. He has a solid route tree, can accelerate well downfield, and has a large body. Sills, though, screamed JAG (just another guy) to me. He plays like an “X” receiver but doesn’t consistently position his body well, is rigid, and unable to go up and get balls. Sills’ biggest red flag, though, is his hands. He drops a lot of balls; both contested and uncontested. His drop rate shows a lack of focus and an inability to perform at the level of the “X” receiver NFL teams would likely want him to be.

A.J. Brown: The Real Star WR from Ole Miss

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

A.J. Brown (6’1”, 225), Wide Receiver, Ole Miss

 

19 Aggregate Score (3.5 Star Prospect)

As D.K. Metcalf has been taking the spotlight due to his combine performance and intriguing traits, fellow Ole Miss receiver A.J. Brown has been hanging around in the shadows.  Even though we all should be excited for Metcalf, Brown has the much more impressive resume, is more reliable and more versatile then Metcalf.  Brown is a very exciting prospect that is starting to become a value in rookie drafts.

Brown was a 4-star recruit coming out of Starkville, Mississippi.  Brown was an Under Armour All-American selection for both football and baseball. He was also selected to the all-state team his senior year.  After receiving some big time offers from teams such as Alabama and Auburn, Brown decided to commit to Ole Miss.

College Production

Brown was extremely productive while at Ole Miss.  As a freshman, Brown played in all 12 games and had 29 catches for 412 yards and 2 touchdowns.  Brown then saw a huge increase in his role his sophomore year by catching 75 ball for 1,252 yards and 11 touchdowns.  Then during his junior year, Brown still found a way to improve and increase his role.  Brown had 85 catches for 1,320 yards and 6 touchdowns.  In both his sophomore and junior seasons, Brown was an All-SEC first team selection, an All-American third team selection (AP) and Biletnikoff Award semifinalist.

This is obviously great production for Brown, especially in an offense that had Metcalf, Damarkus Lodge and Dawson Knox all competing for targets.  Brown definitely benefited from Metcalf and Lodge spreading the field on the outside, but I honestly believe that he would have been able to produce in any offense in college.

Speed/Acceleration: Aggregate Score: 3.6 (Personal Score: 4)

Brown does have some great speed but won’t be a burner in the NFL.  He is really fast getting off the line of scrimmage and is quick in the open field.  Brown does a great job of displaying his speed and acceleration after the catch.  Brown accelerates to space and does a good job of making guys miss, which allows him to pick up quite a bit of yards after the catch.  When you combine his speed with his size, Brown can be extremely successful out of the slot and even contribute on the outside.

Route Running: Aggregate Score: 4.3 (Personal Score: 4)

It seems like Brown is always open.  He is very crisp and sharp with his routes, which allows him to gain an extra step on defenders.  Brown excels in the short and intermediate area of the field, mainly running curls, digs and slants.  Brown showed that he can create separation on the outside.  His versatility should help him see the field and experience success right away.  My only complaint about Brown’s route running is that I wish he would have displayed a larger route tree with some deeper routes.

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 3 (Personal Score: 2)

I am by far the lowest of The Fantasy Fanalysts on Brown’s blocking.  I just don’t see it.  He has the size and does show some decent blocks, but from what I saw, he was extremely inconsistent.  I may have to go back and watch some more and see what the rest of the crew is seeing.  Either way, he has a base there that should allow him to develop and improve as a blocker.

Handwork/Positioning: Aggregate Score: 4 (Personal Score: 4)

Brown displays some solid handwork in his routes.  He uses his hands to help create separation, which is extremely effective when combined with his speed. Brown does a great job of using his hands to catch the ball and not letting it come in on his body.  He is also great at finding the open space and positioning himself away from defenders.  Brown did show instances of struggling with contested catches but that’s not a huge part of his game.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score: 4 (Personal Score: 4)

Brown displays a ton of athleticism after the catch.  He is very elusive and is constantly extending plays by making defenders miss.  Brown has great body control and rarely goes down on first contact.  He can stop on a dime and accelerate extremely quickly.  Brown’s ability after the catch will help him experience success in the NFL.

Conclusion: Mid – Late 1st round pick

Brown projects to be primarily a slot receiver in the NFL.  If given this role, he can end up being a QB’s best friend.  Brown has all the tools to be a consistent top 24 WR for fantasy purposes.  As it stands, I’d feel extremely comfortable taking Brown in the middle of the 1st round of rookie drafts.  If he ends up being drafted to a great landing spot in the 1st or early 2nd round of the NFL Draft, I could definitely understand taking him towards the 1.03/1.04.  Get excited people, Brown is going to be a stud in the NFL!

Parris Campbell: Young, Talented and Plenty to Like

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

Parris Campbell (6’1”, 208), Wide Receiver, Ohio State

Parris Campbell seemed to be flying a bit under the radar heading into Draft season. After tearing up the NFL combine, he has officially started to get some buzz. The question here, as is the case with all of the combine warriors, is if the buzz is warranted? In the case of Parris Campbell, it’s an emphatic yes.

18.3 Aggregate Score (4 Star Prospect)

Parris Campbell was born in 1997. Let that sink in for a minute (ok now that we’re done feeling old) and realize that Campbell will just be turning 22 in time for training camp. For the 2015 season, he was 18. For the 2016 season, he was 19 and for the 2017 season he was 20. His production during those 3 years was nothing special. He accumulated just 53 catches for 705 yards and 3 touchdowns.

It wasn’t until his senior year that Campbell would finally break out and have a stellar season. He totaled 90 catches for 1,063 yards and 12 touchdowns. He is extremely young but has worked for 4 years to refine his craft as a wide receiver. I believe he can be very productive at the NFL level.

Speed/Acceleration: Aggregate Score 4.3 (Personal Score 4)

Campbell has good game speed and can burn. He works in and out of his cuts with ease and has the ability to turn on the burners. While I would argue his agility and ability to make quick cuts is his bread and butter, he still has speed to boot. He ran a 4.31 at the NFL Combine, which is blazing fast. No concerns in this area of his game.

Route Running: Aggregate Score 4.6 (Personal Score 5)

This is where Campbell really shines. He is an absolutely electric route runner. He can get open at will and is just a wide-open target waiting to happen. It is difficult to tell just how much the Ohio State offense helped in this regard but I believe Campbell deserves a lot of credit for his ability to find sot spots in the opposing defenses. He is already an elite route runner and an NFL team will fall in love with him because of this aspect of his game.

Blocking: Aggregate Score 1.6 (Personal Score 2)

The only negative to Campbell’s game is his blocking, which was virtually non-existent in the tape that we watched. While he may have some blocking chops, he just didn’t do it enough to warrant a high score. I know this is for fantasy football and those that play could give a hoot about blocking but this is a way to stay on the field. If you’re not a good blocker, then you will be coming off the field for someone who is and it therefore takes more opportunities away from you.

Handwork/Positioning: Aggregate Score 3.6 (Personal Score 3)

The best thing going for Campbell when it comes to this category is he has some fire in him. If you come to the line and press him, he has the ability to embarrass you. He’s a gamer and he won’t just let you dominate him at the LOS. He has good enough size to shake defenders at the line and if you get beat when trying to press him then good luck trying to catch him.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score 4 (Personal Score 4)

His combine speaks to his athleticism. He posted elite scores up and down the board. The only area he scored poorly in was the bench press where he posted just 11 reps and everything else was in the upper echelon for wide receivers. Campbell clearly possesses some traits that NFL teams would love to have on their team. He can be a game breaker with the way he plays the game.

Conclusion: Late 1st– Early 2nd

Campbell projects to be a slot receiver in the NFL and while I understand those projections; I can’t help but think he can be something more. I may be higher on Campbell than most but the combine along with the tape just doesn’t lie, he can be an elite receiver. Sorry if you’ve heard this before but his landing spot will matter big time. If he can find himself on a team like the Patriots or the Saints then I will gladly take him in the late 1st or early second round. His potential is undeniable.

Welcome to Hollywood, NFL: Brown a 4 Star Prospect

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters. 

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Marquise Brown (5’10”, 168) Wide Receiver, Oklahoma

18.3 Aggregate Score (4 Star Prospect)

Marquise “Hollywood” Brown isn’t like most of the other top end receivers in this draft.  He isn’t that big body wide receiver that projects to be a prototypical WR1.  Brown is a small, shifty player that will most likely be a burner in the NFL. Brown’s speed and acceleration allowed him to be very productive in college and should allow him to continue producing in the NFL

Unfortunately for Brown, it came out a couple of weeks ago that he had surgery for a Lisfranc injury last month.  Lisfranc is an injury that has to deal with one of the bones in the mid-foot breaking.  Considering guys like Le’Veon Bell and Dwight Freeney have had similar surgeries and continued to improve, this isn’t the end of the world for Brown.  It’s been reported that he should be ready for summer training camp, but this will definitely have an effect on his draft stock.  Let’s just hope there aren’t any complications or lingering issues.

College Production

Before attending Oklahoma, Brown spent a season at College of Canyons, a junior college in California. At College of Canyons, Brown led the team with 50 receptions for 754 yards and 10 touchdowns.  Brown also returned kickoffs and punts, totaling almost 600 yards and another two scores.  Rated as the number 10 junior college player in the country by Rivals, Brown decided to transfer to Oklahoma after one season.

Brown didn’t miss a beat when he got to Oklahoma.  His sophomore season (2017), Brown had 57 receptions for 1,095 yards and 7 touchdowns.  Brown really performed when it mattered by putting up a combined 201 yards and 2 touchdowns in the Big 12 championship and CFP semifinal.  He then followed that up with an even more impressive junior year.  Brown had 75 catches for 1,318 yards and 10 touchdowns.  Brown was named as a First-Team All-American and a First-Team All-Big 12 honoree.

The numbers don’t lie.  Brown produced at a ridiculous level in college, averaging nearly 18.3 yards per reception.  I understand that this was against Big 12 defenses, but this is still impressive.  Brown showed that he has the ability to make big plays from pretty much every part of the field

Speed & Acceleration: Aggregate Score: 5 (Personal Score: 5)

Holy Smokes! Brown is extremely fast.  Brown has a great release at the line of scrimmage and accelerates into his routes very quickly.  If he was running at the combine, he probably would end up running in the low 4.3 range.  The most impressive part of his speed is that he displays it more than just on fly routes.  He’s able to maintain his speed in breaking routes, such as posts and slants, and is a huge threat after the catch on short routes.

Route Running: Aggregate Score: 3 (Personal Score: 3)

Route Running is extremely difficult to evaluate with speed guys, mainly because the main source of their separation is their speed.  This holds true with Brown.  He is able to create separation at all levels of the field.  He displayed a pretty diverse route tree including 9 routes, posts, comebacks, slants, drags, digs and screens.  He showed subtle footwork and change of direction that proved effective, but again, most of the separation he creates is from his speed.

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 2.6 (Personal Score: 3)

For being a small receiver, Brown shows a lot of willingness and aggression when it comes to blocking.  Now, he’s obviously not going to truck a DB and put him on his back, but Brown will definitely engage and try to prevent his guys from becoming part of the play.  Brown does a decent job of positioning himself to help create holes.

Handwork & Positioning: Aggregate Score: 3.3 (Personal Score: 3)

Due to his speed, Brown didn’t have to display a ton of handwork and footwork during his routes.  In the games I watched, I only saw him in one contested catch scenario, where he got the ball, but eventually got it punched out.  Brown does a really good job of reading the defense and running his routes to open space.  This allows him to catch the ball in space and have the opportunity to gain yards after the catch.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score: 4.3 (Personal Score: 4)

Brown is a great athlete.  On top of his speed, Brown shows good agility, explosiveness and body control.  However, because of relying on his speed, Brown rarely uses his agility to break tackles after the catch. I really think if he becomes more comfortable in this area of his game, he will become an even bigger threat at the NFL level.

Conclusion:  2nd Round Target

Draft capital is going to tell me a lot about Brown and this Lisfranc injury.  Once thought to be a possible 1st round pick, Brown has the talent to be a serious contributor at the NFL level.  I will feel a lot more confident in Brown and his health if someone spends a Day 2 pick on him.  If that’s the case, I’d be targeting Brown near the middle of the 2nd round in traditional rookie drafts.  That’s a relatively cheap price for a player that has a ton of upside.  However, if Brown falls to Day 3 of the draft, that tells me that teams are worried about his health, which will probably push Brown down my rankings.