Darrell Henderson: 4 Star Prospect with Explosive Potential

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

Darrell Henderson (5’8”, 208), Running Back, Memphis

19 Aggregate Score (4 Star Prospect)

At 5’8 Darrell Henderson may be considered small for a running back, but don’t let the size fool you. Henderson is very good and considered by most to be in the top 5 for RBs this year. He has the complete package when it comes to the CMC/Cohen “super hybrid” backs. What that means is he won’t necessarily bowl anyone over (similar to a downhill back), but that’s not his game anyway. Henderson can operate in space, between the tackles and has good hands, so that already spells success for him at the next level.

College Production

It’s very surprising that Henderson had the success he did given the skill of the backfield. Tony Pollard (fellow 2019 draft classmate) and Patrick Taylor Jr (2020 draft class) are both NFL caliber RBs and I expect to see both drafted to NFL rosters in the 19′ and 20′ classes.

Memphis backfield production:

Patrick Taylor Jr.: 208 carries and 17 receptions for 1319 yards from scrimmage (36th in the nation in rushing yards).

Tony Pollard: 78 carries and 39 receptions for 1010 yards from scrimmage.

Darrell Henderson: 214 carries and 19 receptions for a whopping 2204 yards from scrimmage which was good for 2nd in the nation in both yards from scrimmage and rushing yards.

Henderson definitely maximized his share of the offense almost mirroring Patrick Taylor in carries and receptions. He out-shined the talent in his own backfield in a major way without so much extra chances. This is what makes him stick out as a prospect and rise up my draft board. My knock against him is that in his productive seasons (so & jr) he only played 4 top 50 defenses against the run and 8 in the top 100. The rest of his games (13) were played against defenses that were ranked 100+.

Speed & Agility: Aggregate Score: 5 (Personal Score: 5)

The only running back who ended up with a score of five in our evaluations, Darrell Henderson is one of the fastest in this draft at the position. Giving him a sliver of run room will be a mistake and he will immediately be “gone with the wind”. His change of direction is the best in this class (yes over David Montgomery) and combining that with his speed will be dangerous.

Receiving: Aggregate Score: 3.3 (Personal Score: 3)

I don’t think his receiving chops are bad, but when you factor in how many receptions Pollard and Taylor had (53) vs his own (19), you can see how little room he had to showcase this. I still believe he can be just fine as a pass catcher in the NFL, I just gave him this score based on his lack of chance there. It may just have been that Pollard (RB/WR sleeper) was the more efficient pass catcher given that he had 40% of the receptions.

Vision: Aggregate Score: 4.6 (Personal Score: 5)

Only surpassed by David Montgomery in this metric (by 0.4 points), Darrell Henderson has vision that A LOT of these RBs in this class don’t have. Combining that with his ability to shift and burst out of the backfield , it makes him a tantalizing prospect and one worthy of being ranked in the top 3 at the position. Here’s an example of that combo that he utilizes so well:

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 2 (Personal Score: 2)

There nothing special to see here. He’s not terrible and he’s not amazing, he does his job and won’t put his playing time in jeopardy. He could use some work, but I think this skill will be elevated sooner rather than later in preparation for the draft and again once he gets drafted.

Strength: Aggregate Score: 4 (Personal Score: 4)

He has good strength for a running back but, again, it’s not his calling card. What is specifically special about his strength comes in the area of his ball carrying. He keeps a great “5 points of contact” which is considered the best way to become almost impervious to fumbles. It worked well for him and I think that’s where his strength really matters, keeping that ball to his body.

Conclusion: 1st Round

It’s obviously based on roster construction but I don’t believe he should fall outside of the first round in rookie drafts. He’s one of the best backs in this class and I firmly believe he will stay that way unless he gets drafted behind Todd Gurley or someone of that nature.

N’Keal Harry: Possible WR1 of the NFL Draft?

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

N’Keal Harry (6’2”, 228lbs) Wide Receiver, Arizona State

18 Aggregate Score (4-Star Prospect)

We have been pumping out article after article about the wide receivers in this draft class. It is a deep class that has a lot of people divided on who the best of the bunch is. N’Keal Harry is absolutely under consideration. A 4-star recruit out of Chandler High School in Arizona, Harry chose to remain home despite recruiting efforts from numerous big name schools. He committed to Arizona State in November of 2015.

In 3 years at Arizona State, Harry accumulated 2,889 yards on 213 catches. He scored 22 touchdowns and had an average YPC of 13.6. Along with the production, Harry made numerous highlight reel catches that put him on the radar of many NFL scouts. It’s not hard to see why the NFL is enamored with the Sun Devil WR.

Speed/Acceleration: Aggregate Score: 3.3 (Personal Score: 3)

Before I begin to break down my thoughts on Harry, I feel the need to explain my scores. This is the first year of The 48 Report and since it’s in its infancy, the scoring isn’t necessarily refined just yet. While it is a great system for starters, I felt as if my scores may have not reflected how I truly feel about Harry because I LOVE N’Keal Harry’s game. I’ll say that Harry isn’t a burner but has solid speed. A 4.57 40 yard dash at the combine proves as much. His game speed is good and he will not be docked for this at all.

Route Running: Aggregate Score: 3.3 (Personal Score: 3)

Harry is a precise route runner. He sets up defenders to make them look foolish. He also ran quite a few screens at Arizona State, which showed their propensity to get the ball into his hands. While he could always use some polish coming out of college, Harry seems to be pretty refined in this area of his game.

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 3 (Personal Score: 1)

I understand that I am a bit tougher in terms of scoring when it comes to blocking but Harry disappointed in this area. For a bigger guy who has a lot of strength (27 reps on the bench press at the combine), he isn’t as physical/aggressive as I would like him to be. He also was late at times getting to his blocks. He just did not impress me when it came to blocking for his teammates.

Handwork/Positioning: Aggregate Score: 3 (Personal Score: 3)

Harry has very solid hands and can swat defenders away with ease. He should have no problem beating press coverage in the NFL. The only thing I wish Arizona State did more of was throwing some jump balls his way. He is incredible when making contested catches and if he lands with a QB who trusts his receivers with 50/50 balls then Harry will be a problem in the NFL.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score: 4.3 (Personal Score: 4)

Harry is an athletic freak and his combine/pro day proved that. Hell his career at Arizona State proved as much. His vertical is impressive, his hands are top notch and he can get up to speed pretty well for his size. He is a physical specimen who deserves all the love he is getting heading into the draft.

Conclusion: Top 5 Fantasy Football pick

If you have the 1.01, you’re going to be considering N’Keal Harry. There is a lot of buzz around him right now and if I had to guess, he’s likely to go somewhere in the late first round. Our guys have been projecting him to the Colts with the 26th overall pick. If he lands in an ideal spot then Harry will be under serious consideration for the 1.01 in rookie drafts.

Brett Rypien: Late Round QB has 3 Star Potential

Brett Rypien (6’1, 210), Quarterback, Boise State

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full database of 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer. All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

15.3 Aggregate Score (3 Star Prospect)

Brett Rypien is one of the smaller QBs in this less than savory draft, but the size takes nothing away from how good he can be. He did all the right things in college, ranking in the top 30 in several categories. On tape, he looks really good and reminds me of a shorter Drew Lock (who I love) and rightfully so. I came away with the feeling I rarely get with some of these prospects; he’s got the full package and I’m here to tell you why I believe he’ll be a top 5 QB from this class when it’s all said and done.

Arm Strength: Aggregate Score 4 (Personal Score 4)

Rypien doesn’t have that effortless rocket launcher like Haskins and Tyree Jackson, but he’s no slouch. Wherever the ball needs to be, he can get it there and with great velocity, especially on short routes. What this score of 4 says to me is that Rypien has got an above average arm and will do just fine in an NFL setting. You don’t need immaculate arm strength to succeed in the league.

Accuracy: Aggregate Score 3 (Personal Score 4)

Rypien was voted to have just an average arm and even received a 2 (below average) from one of our evaluators. I am not of the camp that thinks he isn’t above average with his accuracy. His issues lay in the fact that his receivers were not making the catches that they should have. It reminded me again of Drew Lock, who when Hall went down, the “other guys” struggled to make plays at the same level. His ball placement is one of the best in this class and will help separate him in the long run.

Decision Making: Aggregate Score 2.3 (Personal Score 3)

His decision making is not the best, but it’s not the worst either. I don’t think he’s below average as his aggregate score suggests, I just think he’s trying to force his options into plays that they can’t complete. It kind of goes into his accuracy “issues” where he’s trying to make up for what he doesn’t have on the field by making them better but he’s not quite there yet. I’m thinking he needs average to above average weapons early on to succeed until he gets better here. However, I absolutely think that he will be fine going through his progressions on the next level and does not struggle with that side of his game at all.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score 2.3 (Personal Score 3)

This is a metric I’m not too worried about given the style of QB I think he is (a pocket passer), but it is worth noting that he can “get out and boogey” similar to some other QBs in this draft. What I mean by “get out and boogey” is that these guys have the capability to escape when the pocket breaks down as well as run for some short yardage when a play breaks down.

Mechanics: Aggregate Score 3.6 (Personal Score 4)

Rypien is pretty good here but isn’t going to blow evaluators away. The only little red flag I have on him is that he doesn’t keep consistent in some games and ends up throwing wobblers. Those tight spirals you want to see get lost on him sometimes but again, I think that has to do with the same reasonings I had with his decision making. Trying to force the issue pulled him out of comfort zones in a bad way and caused his mechanics to be off. This is my issue with him and I know it’s something that can be corrected on the next level.

Conclusion: 4th-Waivers

There’s prospects that you want to let fall because there’s no way they get drafted. Rypien is not one of those prospects. I say that because in a few years (meaning he still needs to sit and learn) Rypien will easily be a starter in this league. He has patience, has the right ideas when operating out of the pocket and has enough mobility to not be excessively sacked. My best comp I can give for him in terms of career is this: He’ll be the QB12-15 most of his career with a pro bowl or two here or there and you can take that to the bank. I don’t feel like many of the QBs in this draft will even sniff that.

Parris Campbell: Young, Talented and Plenty to Like

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

Parris Campbell (6’1”, 208), Wide Receiver, Ohio State

Parris Campbell seemed to be flying a bit under the radar heading into Draft season. After tearing up the NFL combine, he has officially started to get some buzz. The question here, as is the case with all of the combine warriors, is if the buzz is warranted? In the case of Parris Campbell, it’s an emphatic yes.

18.3 Aggregate Score (4 Star Prospect)

Parris Campbell was born in 1997. Let that sink in for a minute (ok now that we’re done feeling old) and realize that Campbell will just be turning 22 in time for training camp. For the 2015 season, he was 18. For the 2016 season, he was 19 and for the 2017 season he was 20. His production during those 3 years was nothing special. He accumulated just 53 catches for 705 yards and 3 touchdowns.

It wasn’t until his senior year that Campbell would finally break out and have a stellar season. He totaled 90 catches for 1,063 yards and 12 touchdowns. He is extremely young but has worked for 4 years to refine his craft as a wide receiver. I believe he can be very productive at the NFL level.

Speed/Acceleration: Aggregate Score 4.3 (Personal Score 4)

Campbell has good game speed and can burn. He works in and out of his cuts with ease and has the ability to turn on the burners. While I would argue his agility and ability to make quick cuts is his bread and butter, he still has speed to boot. He ran a 4.31 at the NFL Combine, which is blazing fast. No concerns in this area of his game.

Route Running: Aggregate Score 4.6 (Personal Score 5)

This is where Campbell really shines. He is an absolutely electric route runner. He can get open at will and is just a wide-open target waiting to happen. It is difficult to tell just how much the Ohio State offense helped in this regard but I believe Campbell deserves a lot of credit for his ability to find sot spots in the opposing defenses. He is already an elite route runner and an NFL team will fall in love with him because of this aspect of his game.

Blocking: Aggregate Score 1.6 (Personal Score 2)

The only negative to Campbell’s game is his blocking, which was virtually non-existent in the tape that we watched. While he may have some blocking chops, he just didn’t do it enough to warrant a high score. I know this is for fantasy football and those that play could give a hoot about blocking but this is a way to stay on the field. If you’re not a good blocker, then you will be coming off the field for someone who is and it therefore takes more opportunities away from you.

Handwork/Positioning: Aggregate Score 3.6 (Personal Score 3)

The best thing going for Campbell when it comes to this category is he has some fire in him. If you come to the line and press him, he has the ability to embarrass you. He’s a gamer and he won’t just let you dominate him at the LOS. He has good enough size to shake defenders at the line and if you get beat when trying to press him then good luck trying to catch him.

Athleticism: Aggregate Score 4 (Personal Score 4)

His combine speaks to his athleticism. He posted elite scores up and down the board. The only area he scored poorly in was the bench press where he posted just 11 reps and everything else was in the upper echelon for wide receivers. Campbell clearly possesses some traits that NFL teams would love to have on their team. He can be a game breaker with the way he plays the game.

Conclusion: Late 1st– Early 2nd

Campbell projects to be a slot receiver in the NFL and while I understand those projections; I can’t help but think he can be something more. I may be higher on Campbell than most but the combine along with the tape just doesn’t lie, he can be an elite receiver. Sorry if you’ve heard this before but his landing spot will matter big time. If he can find himself on a team like the Patriots or the Saints then I will gladly take him in the late 1st or early second round. His potential is undeniable.

Sleeper Alert! Trayveon Williams: 3 Star Fantasy Football Prospect

Welcome to the 48 Report, a full working database including 48 of our favorite 2019 Draft Prospects. The key, however, is that we focus specifically on their ability to translate as fantasy football players. All players in the database have been/will be scored by 3 writers, and this is their article; explaining their aggregate score, as well as the score of their writer.

All categories are scored on a 1-5 scale; with 5 being the highest score a prospect can receive. The highest aggregate average scores a player can receive is 25. Articles will be posted January-April, all the way up to the draft. Ratings will be adjusted after the combine, based on measurables and after the draft, because as we all know: landing spot matters.

Trayveon Williams (5’9, 200), Running Back, Texas A&M

16 Aggregate Score (3 Star Prospect)

The first thing that people will notice right away is his diminutive size. I need you to throw all of that out the window because the tape doesn’t lie: he plays bigger than his size indicates. In the same mold as Dion Lewis, Williams can run in between the tackles with great vision. His balanced running style is a testament to his strength and balance as a runner. He is absolutely a guy to keep an eye on in the lead up to the draft.

College Production

As a freshman, Williams toted the rock 156 times for 1,087 yards (6.8 YPC) and 8 touchdowns. In the receiving department, he totaled 19 receptions for 91 yards. A modest start to Williams’ collegiate career but he would unfortunately suffer setbacks in year 2. As a sophomore, Williams failed to break 1,000 yards rushing. He totaled 798 yards on 173 carries (4.6 YPC) to go along with 8 touchdowns. He took a step forward in the receiving department totaling 192 yards on 20 receptions.

As a junior, Williams broke out in a big way. He ran the ball 271 times for 1,760 yards and scored an outrageous 18 touchdowns on the ground. He also added in 27 receptions for 278 yards and a touchdown in the receiving game. It all finally clicked for Williams and now he looks to take the next step in the NFL.

Speed/Agility: Aggregate Score: 4.3 (Personal Score: 4)

Trayveon Williams has very good speed and can move very smoothly in and out of tight spots. Due to his size, it is often hard to get a beat on where he is behind the line of scrimmage. The Dion Lewis comparisons are going to follow Williams everywhere and they honestly fit him pretty well.

Receiving: Aggregate Score: 3.6 (Personal Score: 3)

Williams rarely ever left the field. He was on the field for running and passing downs. When I reviewed his tape, I saw him run multiple routes and he looked good doing it. He definitely has the chops to be an all-around back in the NFL.

Vision: Aggregate Score: 4.3 (Personal Score: 5)

This might be Williams’ best trait and his size helps him avoid defenders simply because it’s hard to find him and get him down once he gets the ball. He is able to find holes and hit them with great burst. He has a very clean and quick jump cut that allows him to make positive plays. His vision will be loved by many scouts leading up to the draft and will be one reason he is on so many radars.

Blocking: Aggregate Score: 1.6 (Personal Score: 2)

The biggest concern is his size, which will get him manhandled at times. He needs to lower his shoulder more on chip blocks. If he can put a little more power behind his chip blocks then he would have a better score. This is an area to work on for Williams; he’ll have to work on this area if he wants to stay on the field more.

Strength: Aggregate Score: 2.6 (Personal Score: 3)

Williams is a very balanced running back. His running style allows him to maintain his balance and he has the ability to take some hits and keep on chugging along. He has a good base that allows him to keep his feet as well. For a guy who isn’t over 5’10, he can lower the boom on defenders who don’t see it coming.

Conclusion: 2nd round pick

Get ready to take a shot because here it is; depending on the landing spot, Williams might be the steal of fantasy drafts when it’s time to select. If he lands in a spot in need of an all around back then his stock will rise big time. If he is available in the second round of rookie drafts then I would absolutely pull the trigger on him. He could provide immediate return on investment.